Review: The Fifth Season

First off, a huge thanks to Aentee from Read At Midnight for recommending this book. Had I known what a jewel The Fifth Season is, I would have read it sooner. Click here for her review of the book.

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Synopsis

THIS IS THE WAY THE WORLD ENDS… FOR THE LAST TIME.
A season of endings has begun.
It starts with the great red rift across the heart of the world’s sole continent, spewing ash that blots out the sun.
It starts with death, with a murdered son and a missing daughter.
It starts with betrayal, and long dormant wounds rising up to fester.
This is the Stillness, a land long familiar with catastrophe, where the power of the earth is wielded as a weapon. And where there is no mercy.


Ratings: ☕☕☕☕☕ 5/5

Let’s start with the end of the world, why don’t we? Get it over with and move on to more important things.

There are many great, well-known fantasy books that have a strong engaging narration, incredibly realistic and powerful world building, heartbreaking plot twists and characters so unforgettable that you can’t help but be emotionally invested in them as if they were real, all written with such skill and perfect execution that you are transported into a time and place far far away from the reality you live in, which is exactly the reason why you read fantasy in the first place. To discover a world unlike any you know.

Then there’s The Fifth Season.

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All The Light We Cannot See

5 out of 5 stars:  ★★★★★

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Without a doubt, the most haunting story I have ever read.

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((You  can click on the name of the book to visit its Goodreads page, and on the author’s name for more information about the author.))

This book is more than a story about the Second World War. Following the stories of a  sixteen-year-old blind Parisian named Marie-Laure LeBlanc and an eighteen-year-old incredibly talented German named Werner Pfennigg, All The Light We Cannot See drives home the senselessness of wars and the loss of innocence and great minds for something as trifle as want of power.

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